Related Projects

Aging well: Partnering to optimize social network and support for older immigrants in Ontario (2016 - Ongoing)

The Aging Well project seeks to improve our current understanding of older immigrants' social needs, networks and support, and how these shape their capacity, resilience, and independence in aging well in Ontario. Our project builds on existing literature and our own work, and will address gaps in knowledge, policy, and practice. To accomplish our goal, we are leveraging the research team's existing collaborations and building new partnerships among academics and community agencies serving older immigrant adults across Ontario.

Canadian Network for the Prevention of Elder Abuse (CNPEA)

The CNPEA connects people and organizations, foster the exchange of reliable information, and advance program and policy development on issues related to preventing the abuse of older adults. To do this, the CNPEA works at the local, regional, provincial/territorial, and national levels. The network has a membership of individuals and organizations from across Canada who come from all walks of life and who care about older adults and the prevention of harm in later life.

National Seniors Strategy

Given that the life expectancy of Canadians has almost doubled over the last century, our coming of age should be recognized as triumph rather than a disease. Older Canadians are now the fastest growing segment of our population with their numbers expected to double over the next two decades so that by then, one in four Canadians will be older than 65 years of age. This unprecedented demographic shift will present both challenges and opportunities. With a growing number of Canadians, health and social care professionals, economists, and national organizations suggesting its time for a National Senior Strategy, this website has been conceived as a way to provide an evidence-based view on how to consider the concepts that could and should be considered and included in a national approach.

This project was funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC)